Pre-Winter Storm, Southwestern Australia (NASA, International Space Station, 03/29/14)

Some cool credit monitoring images:

Pre-Winter Storm, Southwestern Australia (NASA, International Space Station, 03/29/14)
credit monitoring
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
One of the Expedition 39 crew members aboard the International Space Station on March 29 used a 14mm lens on a digital still camera to photograph this pre-winter storm located just off the coast of southwestern Australia. A solar array panel on the orbital outpost is in the left side of the frame.

About Crew Earth Observations:

In Crew Earth Observations (CEO), crewmembers on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. A major emphasis of CEO is to monitor disaster response events in support of the International Disaster Charter (IDC). CEO imagery provides researchers on Earth with key data to understand the planet from the perspective of the ISS. Crewmembers have been photographing Earth from space since the early Mercury missions beginning in 1961. The continuous images taken from the ISS ensure this record remains unbroken.

Image credit: NASA

Original image:
www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/14088550263/in/set-721…

More about space station research:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

View more photos like this in the "NASA Earth Images" Flickr photoset:
www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05

________________________________
These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

Sunglint on the Bering Sea (NASA, International Space Station, 04/22/14)
credit monitoring
Image by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center
As the International Space Station passed over the Bering Sea on Earth Day, one of the Expedition 39 crew members aboard the orbital outpost shot this panoramic scene looking toward Russia. The Kamchatka Peninsula can be seen in the foreground. Sunglint is visible on the left side of the frame. Only two points of view from Earth orbit were better for taking in this scene than that of the crew member with the camera inside, and those belonged to the two spacewalking astronauts — Flight Engineers Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson of NASA.

About Crew Earth Observations:

In Crew Earth Observations (CEO), crewmembers on the International Space Station (ISS) photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time, from human-caused changes like urban growth and reservoir construction, to natural dynamic events such as hurricanes, floods and volcanic eruptions. A major emphasis of CEO is to monitor disaster response events in support of the International Disaster Charter (IDC). CEO imagery provides researchers on Earth with key data to understand the planet from the perspective of the ISS. Crewmembers have been photographing Earth from space since the early Mercury missions beginning in 1961. The continuous images taken from the ISS ensure this record remains unbroken.

Image credit: NASA

Original image:
www.flickr.com/photos/nasa2explore/13996129541/in/set-721…

More about space station research:
www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html

View more photos like this in the "NASA Earth Images" Flickr photoset:
www.flickr.com/photos/28634332@N05

________________________________
These official NASA photographs are being made available for publication by news organizations and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photographs. The photographs may not be used in materials, advertisements, products, or promotions that in any way suggest approval or endorsement by NASA. All Images used must be credited. For information on usage rights please visit: www.nasa.gov/audience/formedia/features/MP_Photo_Guidelin…

Happy Halloween from NASA Goddard
credit monitoring
Image by NASA Goddard Photo and Video
This trick that the planet is looking back at you is actually a Hubble treat: An eerie, close-up view of Jupiter, the biggest planet in our solar system. Hubble was monitoring changes in Jupiter’s immense Great Red Spot (GRS) storm on April 21, 2014, when the shadow of the Jovian moon, Ganymede, swept across the center of the storm. This gave the giant planet the uncanny appearance of having a pupil in the center of a 10,000 mile-diameter “eye.” For a moment, Jupiter “stared” back at Hubble like a one-eyed giant Cyclops.

Credit: NASA, ESA, and A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center)

NASA image use policy.
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission.
Follow us on Twitter
Like us on Facebook
Find us on Instagram