Trees cocooned in spiders webs after flooding in Sindh, Pakistan

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Trees cocooned in spiders webs after flooding in Sindh, Pakistan
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Image by DFID – UK Department for International Development
An unexpected side-effect of the flooding in parts of Pakistan has been that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters.

Because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water has taken so long to recede, many trees have become cocooned in spiders webs. People in this part of Sindh have never seen this phenonemon before – but they also report that there are now less mosquitos than they would expect, given the amount of stagnant, standing water that is around.

One local theory is the mosquitos are getting caught in the spiders webs. This would be one blessing for the people of Sindh, facing so many other hardships after the floods.

UK aid – in response to the Pakistan floods – is helping millions of survivors return home and rebuild their lives.

Find out more about the UK government’s response to the Pakistan floods at www.dfid.gov.uk/pakistan-floods-six-months

Picture: Russell Watkins/Department for International Development

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Turkey-3019 – Hagia Sophia
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Hagia Sophia built as the new Cathedral of Constantinople by the Emperor Justinian in 537 AD. In 1453, the Ottoman Sultan Mehmet the Conqueror converted the Great Church into his mosque. Instanbul, Turkey

Today, use of the complex as a place of worship (mosque or church) is strictly prohibited. However, in 2006, it was reported that the Turkish government allowed the allocation of a small room in the museum complex to be used as a prayer room for Christian and Muslim museum staff.